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Tory Hargro, a design manager at USA Today, recently worked on an interactive project about race in America, designed to remove talking heads from the conversation.

USA Today recently experimented with a storytelling format that gives users the power to design the story they want to consume, based on their interests.

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A new app being pioneered in San Francisco tells stories based on a listener's location.

Detour is a new audio app that tells location-based stories on people’s smartphones.

126 SHARES
New York Times

A behind-the-scenes look at the social media strategy at The New York Times.

240 SHARES
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Lisa Tucker
Lisa Rossi
Judd Slivka
Josh Davidsburg
Adrianne Flynn
Amanda Eisenberg
Josh Logue
Tory Hargro, a design manager at USA Today, recently worked on an interactive project about race in America, designed to remove talking heads from the conversation.
Here’s One Way to Tell Stories About Race: Remove the Journalists

USA Today recently experimented with a storytelling format that gives users the power to design the story they want to consume, based on their interests.

A new app being pioneered in San Francisco tells stories based on a listener's location.
New ‘Podcast’ App Tells Stories Based on Location

Detour is a new audio app that tells location-based stories on people’s smartphones.

New York Times
The New York Times on Social Media: Not About the ‘Hyperbole’

A behind-the-scenes look at the social media strategy at The New York Times.

Punxsutawney Phil at Gobbler's Knob in Punxsutawney, Pa.
Meet the Reporter Who Used Data to ‘Take Punxsutawney Phil Down’

Punxsutawney Phil comes under the scrutiny of one determined data reporter.

What One Young Journalist Thinks of #AdviceForYoungJournalists

When big-name journalists in the limelight come under scrutiny for errors, everyone likes to pile on and say something about how journalism should be done. Brian Williams has been a trending topic all week. Maybe that is why in the past two days social media users are eager to share their #AdviceForYoungJournalists.

This hashtag caught fire on Twitter this week after seasoned journalist Felix Salmon wrote on open letter on Fusion in response to young journalists asking for advice. He warns readers that journalism is a “dumb career move,” and warns “enormous numbers of incredibly talented journalists find it almost impossible to make a decent living at this game.”

Obviously, that kind of career path isn’t replicable. Nor should we want it to be, given the starring role played by the global financial crisis. And so if you want my advice, it’s simply this: it doesn’t matter how good you are at what you do, your success, in this industry, is always going to be governed in large part by luck. There’s no particular reason to believe that the best route to success is to first get your foot in the door churning out listicles, and then somehow work your way up the ranks. That might have worked for a few early BuzzFeed employees, but they, too, were lucky, winning the pick-the-right-startup lottery.

As a senior about to graduate with the very degree that everyone is parsing this week on Twitter, I decided to grab my favorites from the hashtag, and include my reactions.

https://twitter.com/jeffbradynpr/status/565166648743960576

My Take: I feel like this is actually the truth. Journalism is all about the internships and honing your skills, right? Out of all of the tweets, this one from Jeff Brady, an NPR correspondent, resonated with me the most.

https://twitter.com/piersmorgan/status/565178850003271680

My Take: I think there’s always going to be critics when you are writer. It’s a matter of sticking to your guns and reporting stories that need to be told.

This trend is also shedding light to old interviews from industry professionals like Jim Lehrer. PBS NewsHour used this trend as an opportunity to resuscitate Lehrer’s 2009 interview on the guidelines of journalism.

https://twitter.com/NewsHour/status/565179689002881024 ;
My Take: I’m glad PBS NewsHour used the trending hashtag on young journalists as an opportunity to resuscitate the late Jim Lehrer’s 2009 interview on the guidelines of journalism. I think a lot of famous journalists get lost when it comes to ethics. It seems like many are just concerned about pageviews. All of the sudden, you are rewording headlines. They are misleading. Today, everything seems all twisted. These guidelines from Lehrer should be required reading for all young journalists.

https://twitter.com/JimmyOrr/status/565029806727634944

My Take: I think Orr’s comments highlight the real change in the industry. The reality is, every young journalist knows and reads news from these outlets. It’s nothing unusual or novel for us, it’s just simply part of the news cocktail we consume every day.

https://twitter.com/albertocairo/status/565138217109045248

My Take; I love this. It sounds inspirational. That’s one of the reason I love journalism. It’s a way to tell a story and look deeper into someone’s life. It’s a profession with purpose and meaning.

https://twitter.com/DixieSwanson1/status/565171238243299328 ;

My Take: I just think this photo is hilarious.

https://twitter.com/FelicityMorse/status/565110248881795072 ;

My Take: In one of my classes at University of Maryland, I heard a journalist talk about his work. Honestly, I loved hearing it. It’s a lot of blood and sweat to get the story. I’m personally proud of every story I’ve written. I’d imagine if you are a veteran journalist, you’d be very proud – and you’d want to talk about it. Well, we want to listen.

Vox.com Editor-in-chief Ezra Klein pushed out a piece this week touting his best advice to young journalists as well. I noticed how he was critical on the value of journalism school.

“Don’t go to journalism school. You’re better off just interning, or writing a blog, or reading think-tank papers. When I hire, I see j-school experience as neutral — it doesn’t separate one resume from another in the least. And a lot of journalism schools teach bad habits, and make you pay for the privilege of learning them.”

My Take: I understand how many might say that internships are the best place to learn how to write. But I learned a lot about it in the classroom, a safe place where I could produce content while under the stress of a deadline and challenge myself to take it to the next level. I learned about media law and ethics while in J-school. And I learned how to interview different types of people. In my news writing class of sophomore year, I interviewed a chief police officer, city council members, business owners, and local church leaders for various articles. These aren’t “bad habits” – they are the start of a career.

Jackie-Spinner-camera
Sun-Times Layoffs of Video Staff Come Amid Journalism Industry’s Video Boom

The layoffs came as news organizations across the country are investing more in originally-produced video.

Lisa Tucker
Lisa Rossi
Judd Slivka
Josh Davidsburg
Adrianne Flynn
Amanda Eisenberg
Josh Logue
Shea Winpigler
Andrew Montalenti
Shea Winpigler